Note: This is a project under development. The articles on this wiki are just being initiated and broadly incomplete. You can Help creating new pages.

Ammania Baccifera - Blistering ammania

From Ayurwiki
Jump to: navigation, search
Agnigarba, Ammannia baccifera

Ammannia baccifera is many-branched, annual herb. Usually grows upto 10 - 50cm tall. The plant is sometimes gathered from the wild for local use as a food and medicine.

Uses

Skin diseases, Wounds, Swellings, Ringworms, Parasitic skin infection, Fevers, Malaria, Jaundice, Eliminate blood clots.

Parts Used

Young leaves, Root.

Chemical Composition

Yielded four known compounds: β-sitosterol-3-O- β-glucopyranoside, quercctin-3-rutinoside (Rutin), kaempferol-3-O- β-glucopyranoside and quercetin-3-O-α-L-rhamnoside (Quercitrin).[1]

Common names

Language Common name
Kannada Kaadugida
Hindi Aginbuti
Malayalam Kallur vanchi
Tamil Kall-uruvi
Telugu Agnivedana paku
Marathi NA
Gujarathi NA
Punjabi NA
Kashmiri NA
Sanskrit Agnigarbha
English Blistering Ammannia

[2]

Properties

Reference: Dravya - Substance, Rasa - Taste, Guna - Qualities, Veerya - Potency, Vipaka - Post-digesion effect, Karma - Pharmacological activity, Prabhava - Therepeutics.

Dravya

Rasa

Guna

Veerya

Vipaka

Karma

Prabhava

Habit

Herb

Identification

Leaf

Kind Shape Feature
Simple Opposite Stem 4-angled or more or less winged. Leaves decussate, sessile, 2-6 x 0.5-0.8 cm, linear to elliptic, base attenuate, apex acute, chartaceous.

[3]

Flower

Type Size Color and composition Stamen More information
Bisexual Axillary cymes 4 Cymes dischasial, axillary. Flowers 4 or 5-merous, perigynous; pedicels c. 2 mm long. Flowering from October to March

Fruit

Type Size Mass Appearance Seeds More information
Capsule 1.5-2 mm across Globose, exceeding calyx tube Seeds brownish, concavo-convex Fruiting from October to March

Other features

List of Ayurvedic medicine in which the herb is used

Where to get the saplings

Mode of Propagation

Seeds

How to plant/cultivate

The plant is often found as a weed of cultivated land, especially wet sites such as rice fields.[4]

Commonly seen growing in areas

Open areas, Damp area, Waste places, Rice fields.

Photo Gallery

References

  1. Pharmacognostical and Pharmacological Evaluation of Ammannia baccifera by Riddhi Vavaiya
  2. Karnataka Medicinal Plants Volume - 2 by Dr.M. R. Gurudeva, Page No. 168
  3. Morphology
  4. Cultivation

External Links