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Vicoa indica

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Vicoa indica

White dammar is a large, evergreen tree generally growing up to 40 metres tall, but with some specimens reaching 60 metres. A multipurpose tree that is much used locally in India. It yields a resin of considerable value, which is known as White Dammar or Piney, and is often exported. It also supplies food, medicine and a range of other commodities. A very handsome tree, it is often planted along avenues.

Uses

Resin, Rheumatism, Scorpion bite, Sore throat.[1]

Parts Used

Seeds, Bark.

Chemical Composition

The preliminary phytochemical studies were carried out by the methods described by Harborne and Kokate. The plant extracts were screened for the presence of alkaloids, proteins, free amino acids, anthraquinones glycosides, flavonoids, tannins, phenolic compounds, carbohydrates, saponins, phytosterol and triterpenes.[2]

Common names

Language Common name
Kannada Moogatisoppu
Hindi
Malayalam
Tamil Mukuttipundu
Telugu Adavipundu tirugadu
Marathi
Gujarathi
Punjabi
Kashmiri
Sanskrit
English Sonkadi


Properties

Reference: Dravya - Substance, Rasa - Taste, Guna - Qualities, Veerya - Potency, Vipaka - Post-digesion effect, Karma - Pharmacological activity, Prabhava - Therepeutics.

Dravya

Rasa

Guna

Veerya

Vipaka

Karma

Prabhava

Habit

Evergreen tree

Identification

Leaf

Kind Shape Feature
Alternately arranged Oblong lancelike Stalkless, 3-8cm long and hairy

[3]

Flower

Type Size Color and composition Stamen More information
1-2cm across Yellow Occur singly on slender stalks, ray florets Flowering season is February - April

Fruit

Type Size Mass Appearance Seeds More information
Fruiting season is February - April

Other features

List of Ayurvedic medicine in which the herb is used

Where to get the saplings

Mode of Propagation

Seeds

How to plant/cultivate

A tree of low to moderate elevations in the moist, monsoonal tropics, where it can be found at elevations up to 1,200 metres.[4]

Commonly seen growing in areas

Found primarily as a canopy or emergent tree in the west coastal evergreen forests of India, It is also occasionally found in secondary evergreen dipterocarp forest in the south.

Photo Gallery

References

  1. Indian Medicinal Plants by C.P.Khare
  2. Chemical constituents
  3. Kappatagudda - A Repertoire of Medicianal Plants of Gadag by Yashpal Kshirasagar and Sonal Vrishni, Page No. 384
  4. [Cultivation]

External Links