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Cheilocostus speciosus - Kebuka

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Kebuka

Kebuka consists of the dried rhizome of Costus speciosus (Koerning ex Retz.) Smith. (Fam. Zingiberaceae), a herb commonly found in sub-Himalayan tract extending between Kangra to Arunachal Pradesh and also in Western Ghats.

Uses

Fever, Rash, Bronchitis, Asthma, Intestinal worms, Kidney problems, Urinary problems.

Parts Used

Rhizome.

Chemical Composition

The rhizomes contain saponins—dioscin, gracillin and beta-sitosterolbeta-D-glucoside. All parts of the plant yield steroidal sapogenin, diogenin (quantity varies from 0.32 to 4%)[1]

Common names

Language Common name
Kannada Chenglavaa-Koshtu, Changalvakoshtu
Hindi Kebu, Kemuk, Kemuaa
Malayalam Channakkilannu, Channakkuvva
Tamil Koshtam
Telugu Chenglavaa-Koshtu
Marathi NA
Gujarathi NA
Punjabi NA
Kashmiri NA
Sanskrit Pushkarmula
English


Properties

Reference: Dravya - Substance, Rasa - Taste, Guna - Qualities, Veerya - Potency, Vipaka - Post-digesion effect, Karma - Pharmacological activity, Prabhava - Therepeutics.

Dravya

Rasa

Tikta

Guna

Rūkṣa, Laghu

Veerya

Śīta

Vipaka

Kaṭu

Karma

Pittahara, Kaphahara, Dīpana, Pācana, Grāhī, Kṛmighna, Hṛdya, Raktaṣodhaka

Prabhava

Habit

Perennial shrub

Identification

Leaf

Kind Shape Feature
Paripinnate Oblong Leaf Arrangementis Alternate-spiral

[2]

Flower

Type Size Color and composition Stamen More information
Unisexual 2-4cm long pink Flowering throughout the year and In terminal and/or axillary pseudoracemes

Fruit

Type Size Mass Appearance Seeds More information
oblong pod Thinly septate, pilose, wrinkled seeds upto 5 Fruiting throughout the year

Other features

List of Ayurvedic medicine in which the herb is used

[3]

Where to get the saplings

Mode of Propagation

Seeds

How to plant/cultivate

C. speciosus are usually grown in fertile, organic, moist, well-drained soils in shade. Tropical climate with high humidity and minimum temperature 13o C is best for its cultivation. Crepe ginger grows from thick fleshy roots called "rhizomes".[4]

Commonly seen growing in areas

Roadside ditches, Low-lying areas in the forest.

Photo Gallery

References

External Links