Note: This is a project under development. The articles on this wiki are just being initiated and broadly incomplete. You can Help creating new pages.

Galanthus nivalis - Sarpagandha

From Ayurwiki
Jump to: navigation, search
Galanthus nivalis

Galanthus is a small genus of about 20 species of bulbous perennial herbaceous plants in the family Amaryllidaceae. The plants have two linear leaves and a single small white drooping bell shaped flower with six petal-like (petaloid) tepals in two circles.

Uses

high blood sugar, lowering blood pressure, insomnia, hysteria, cataract, plague, fever, Schizophrenia, cholera

Parts Used

Roots, Leaves.

Chemical Composition

ajmaline, ajmalinine and ajmalicine, Serpentine group—serpentine and serpentinine[1]

Common names

Language Common name
Kannada Sutranavi, Patalagondhi
Hindi Sarpagandha
Malayalam Suvapavalforiyan
Tamil Chivan amelpodi
Telugu Paataala goni
Marathi NA
Gujarathi NA
Punjabi NA
Kashmiri NA
Sanskrit Sarpagandha
English Indian Snake Wood


Properties

Reference: Dravya - Substance, Rasa - Taste, Guna - Qualities, Veerya - Potency, Vipaka - Post-digesion effect, Karma - Pharmacological activity, Prabhava - Therepeutics.

Dravya

Rasa

Tikta (Bitter)

Guna

Ruksha (Dry)

Veerya

Ushna (Hot)

Vipaka

Ushna (Hot)

Karma

Vata, Kapha

Prabhava

Habit

Herb

Identification

Leaf

Kind Shape Feature
Simple Oval Oval leaves present in whorl of 3 with paler green below and dark green above, tip is acuminate and base is slender and tapering

[2]

Flower

Type Size Color and composition Stamen More information
Unisexual 4-8cm long white 5-8 Flowers Irregular corymbose white flowers with violet tinge

Fruit

Type Size Mass Appearance Seeds More information
Oval fleshy 1 cm long on ripening color turns to shiny purple black With hooked hairs single {{{6}}}

Other features

List of Ayurvedic medicine in which the herb is used

Where to get the saplings

Mode of Propagation

Seeds, Cuttings.

How to plant/cultivate

June and July are suitable months for transplanting seedlings and vegetatively propagated plants[3]

Commonly seen growing in areas

trophical, subtrophical

Photo Gallery

References

External Links