Note: This is a project under development. The articles on this wiki are just being initiated and broadly incomplete. You can Help creating new pages.

Ficus pumila - Malayu

From Ayurwiki
Jump to: navigation, search
Creeping Fig, Ficus pumila

Ficus pumila is a species of flowering plant in the mulberry family, native to East Asia (China, Japan, Vietnam) and naturalized in parts of the southeastern and south-central United States. This species has been widely grown as an ornamental. In China, Taiwan, and Japan, it is commercially cultivated to make jellies from the fruit.

Uses

Impotence, Lumbago, Rheumatism, Anaemia, Haematuria, Chronic dysentery, Haemorrhoids

Parts Used

Fruits, Leaves.

Chemical Composition

kaempferol, rhamnopyranosyl, glucopyranoside, isoquercitrin, quercitrin, dihydrokaempferol, glucopyranoside, dihydro-kaempferol, glucopyranoside[1]

Common names

Language Common name
Kannada
Hindi
Malayalam
Tamil
Telugu
Marathi NA
Gujarathi NA
Punjabi NA
Kashmiri NA
Sanskrit
English Agrimony


Properties

Reference: Dravya - Substance, Rasa - Taste, Guna - Qualities, Veerya - Potency, Vipaka - Post-digesion effect, Karma - Pharmacological activity, Prabhava - Therepeutics.

Dravya

Rasa

Guna

Veerya

Vipaka

Karma

Prabhava

Habit

Perenial shrub

Identification

Leaf

Kind Shape Feature
Simple Non-Palm Foliage Mature Foliage Texture is Leathery, Rough and Prominent Young Flush Colour is Red

[2]

Flower

Type Size Color and composition Stamen More information
Unisexual 2-4cm long Yellow 5-20 Flower Size is Very small, gathered on inner surface of synconium and Flowering Habit is Polycarpic

Fruit

Type Size Mass Appearance Seeds More information
Fleshy Fruit Fruit Classification is Simple Mature Fruit Colour is Purple, red many {{{6}}}

Other features

List of Ayurvedic medicine in which the herb is used

Where to get the saplings

Mode of Propagation

Seeds, Cuttings.

How to plant/cultivate

Succeeds in tropical and subtropical areas.[3]

Commonly seen growing in areas

Terrestrial, Sub-Tropical Disturbed Area, Open Ground.

Photo Gallery

References

External Links