Note: This is a project under development. The articles on this wiki are just being initiated and broadly incomplete. You can Help creating new pages.

Euphorbia prostrata - Dugdhikā

From Ayurwiki
Jump to: navigation, search
Dugdhikā

Dugdhika is a pantropical weed, possibly native to India. It is a hairy herb that grows in open grasslands roadsides and pathways. It is widely used as a medicinal herb.

Uses

Cough, Coryza, Bronchitis, Asthma, Worm infestations, Dysentery, Jaundice, Pimples, Gonorrhoea, Digestive problems, Tumours.

Parts Used

Leaves

Chemical Composition

Alkanes, Triterpenes, Phytosterols, Tannins, Polyphenols, and Flavanoids[1]

Common names

Language Common name
Kannada Akkegida
Hindi Lal Dudhi
Malayalam Nelapalai
Tamil Amman Pacharisi
Telugu Nanabala
Marathi NA
Gujarathi NA
Punjabi NA
Kashmiri NA
Sanskrit Nagarjuni, Pusitoa
English equirity


Properties

Reference: Dravya - Substance, Rasa - Taste, Guna - Qualities, Veerya - Potency, Vipaka - Post-digesion effect, Karma - Pharmacological activity, Prabhava - Therepeutics.

Dravya

Rasa

Tikta (Bitter), Kashaya (Astringent)

Guna

Laghu (Light), Ruksha (Dry), Tikshna (Sharp)

Veerya

Ushna (Hot)

Vipaka

Katu (Pungent)

Karma

Kapha, Vata

Prabhava

Habit

A small wiry straggler

Identification

Leaf

Kind Shape Feature
Paripinnate opposite -4 cm long, 1-1.5 cm wide, oblong-lanceolate, with a pointed tip and a finely toothed margin

.[2]

Flower

Type Size Color and composition Stamen More information
Unisexual 2-4cm long greenish or pinkish peduncles reddish brown Flowering throughout the year and In terminal and/or axillary pseudoracemes

Fruit

Type Size Mass Appearance Seeds More information
globular clusters Inflorescence dense, globular clusters hairy, 3-lobed capsule, 1.25-2 x 1.5 mm, splitting into three 1-seeded Fruiting throughout the year {{{6}}}

Other features

List of Ayurvedic medicine in which the herb is used

Where to get the saplings

Mode of Propagation

Seeds

How to plant/cultivate

Prefers a light well-drained moderately rich loam in an open sunny position[3]

Commonly seen growing in areas

Waste places in lowland, Cultivated fields in lowland, Moist open places

Photo Gallery

References

External Links