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Cinnamomum cassia - Tamalpatra

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Cassia cinnamon is a type of cinnamon prepared from the dried inner bark of an evergreen tree that grows in areas of southeastern Asia.

Uses

Diabetes, Gastric problem, Stomach spasms, Nausea, Vomiting, Infections, Common cold, Diarrhea, Loss of appetite, Hernia, Bed wetting, Joint pain, Menopausal symptoms, Cramps, Kidney disorders, Chest pain, Abortions, Menstrual problems

Parts Used

Barks, Twigs, Leaves

Chemical Composition

Phenols (6%), Isoeugenol (2%), Chavicol, Ethylgaiacol, Aromatic aldehyde, Cinnamaldehyde (75-85%), Benzaldehyde[1]

Common names

Language Common name
Kannada Tamalapatra
Hindi tezpath
Malayalam
Tamil
Telugu
Marathi NA
Gujarathi NA
Punjabi NA
Kashmiri NA
Sanskrit
English Cinnamomum cassia


Properties

Reference: Dravya - Substance, Rasa - Taste, Guna - Qualities, Veerya - Potency, Vipaka - Post-digesion effect, Karma - Pharmacological activity, Prabhava - Therepeutics.

Dravya

Rasa

Guna

Veerya

Vipaka

Karma

Prabhava

Habit

Evergreen tree

Identification

Leaf

Kind Shape Feature
Simple opposite petiole 8-20 mm, stout, glabrous, slightly grooved above

[2]

Flower

Type Size Color and composition Stamen More information
Bisexual 7 mm long Yellow 9 Flowers are in terminal and axillary

Fruit

Type Size Mass Appearance Seeds More information
berry 1-2 cm ellipsoid to oblong-ovoid, dark purple, surrounded by the enlarged perianth 2-4 {{{6}}}

Other features

List of Ayurvedic medicine in which the herb is used

Where to get the saplings

Mode of Propagation

Seeds, Cuttings.

How to plant/cultivate

A plant of the lowland tropics and subtropics, where it is found at elevations up to 500 metres. It grows best in areas where annual daytime temperatures are within the range 15 - 32°c, but can tolerate 10 - 38°c[3]

Commonly seen growing in areas

At primary forest, At secondary forest.

Photo Gallery

References

External Links