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Caesalpinia bonduc - Latākarañja

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Latākarañja

Latākarañja consists of seed of Caesalpinia bonduc (Linn.) Roxb. (Fam. Caesalpiniaceae), an extensive, shrubby, wild, perennial climber distributed throughout tropical parts of India.

Uses

Malaria, Diabetes, Stomach disorders, Rheumatism, Cough, Fever, Headache, Chest pain, Jaundice, Headache, Chest pain, Diarrhoea, Skin eruptions, Asthma, Internal blood clots.

Parts Used

Seeds.

Chemical Composition

Seeds contain bitter substance phytosterenin, bonducin, saponin, phytosterol, fixed oil, starch and sucrose. Seeds also contain α, β, γ, δ and ζ caesalpins.[1]

Common names

Language Common name
Kannada
Hindi Karanja, Karanjuaa, Kaantaa Karanj
Malayalam Kalamchikuru, Kaalanchi, Kazhinch - Kai
Tamil Kajha shikke, Kalichchikkaai
Telugu Gachchakaay
Marathi NA
Gujarathi NA
Punjabi NA
Kashmiri NA
Sanskrit Kuberākṣa
English Bonduc Nut, Fever Nut


Properties

Reference: Dravya - Substance, Rasa - Taste, Guna - Qualities, Veerya - Potency, Vipaka - Post-digesion effect, Karma - Pharmacological activity, Prabhava - Therepeutics.

Dravya

Rasa

Tikta, Kaṣāya

Guna

Laghu, Rūkṣa

Veerya

Uṣṇa

Vipaka

Kaṭu

Karma

Vātahara, Kaphahara, Tridoṣahara

Prabhava

Habit

Climber

Identification

Leaf

Kind Shape Feature
Paripinnate Oblong Leaf Arrangementis Alternate-spiral

[2]

Flower

Type Size Color and composition Stamen More information
Unisexual 2-4cm long pink Flowering throughout the year and In terminal and/or axillary pseudoracemes

Fruit

Type Size Mass Appearance Seeds More information
oblong pod Thinly septate, pilose, wrinkled seeds upto 5 Fruiting throughout the year

Other features

List of Ayurvedic medicine in which the herb is used

Where to get the saplings

Mode of Propagation

Softwood cuttings, Seeds.

How to plant/cultivate

A plant of lowland tropical areas. Succeeds in any moderately fertile, well-drained soil.[3]

Commonly seen growing in areas

Thickets, Roadsides, Near seashores, Coastal habitats, Back mangal, Disturbed sites.

Photo Gallery

References

  1. The Ayuredic Pharmacopoeia of India Part-1, Volume-5, Page no-14
  2. [ "Morphology"]
  3. "Cultivation detail"

External Links