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Artemisia pallens - Dhavana

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Dried davana plant used as aromatic bouquet.

Davana, Artemisia pallens, is an aromatic herb, In genus of small herbs or shrubs, xerophytic In nature. The flowers are racemose panicles, bear numerous small yellow flower heads or capitula, but the silvery white silky covering of down gives the foliage a grey or white appearance.

Uses

Dry skin, Endocrine system, Cramping, Nausea, Fatigue, Pelvic pain

Parts Used

Flower, Leaves.

Chemical Composition

Davana essential oil comprises of davanone, a major sesquiterpene ketone and other essential components such as linalool, dehydro-a-linalool, terpinen-4 oil, isodavanone, nordavanone, davanafurans, methyl cinnamate, ethyl cinnamate, bicyclogermacrene, davana ether, 2-hydroxyisodavanone, and farnesol.[1]

Common names

Language Common name
Kannada
Hindi
Malayalam
Tamil
Telugu
Marathi NA
Gujarathi NA
Punjabi NA
Kashmiri NA
Sanskrit
English Artemisia pallens, Dhavana


Properties

Reference: Dravya - Substance, Rasa - Taste, Guna - Qualities, Veerya - Potency, Vipaka - Post-digesion effect, Karma - Pharmacological activity, Prabhava - Therepeutics.

Dravya

Rasa

Guna

Veerya

Vipaka

Karma

Prabhava

Habit

traditional herb

Identification

Leaf

Kind Shape Feature
Simple alteranate The leaves are grayish silver, each leaf is devided into smaller segment
[2]

Flower

Type Size Color and composition Stamen More information
Unisexual 2-4cm long Yellow 5 The Flower heads of davana are small and yellow

Fruit

Type Size Mass Appearance Seeds More information
clearly grooved lengthwise, Lowest hooked hairs aligned towards crown With hooked hairs {{{6}}}

Other features

List of Ayurvedic medicine in which the herb is used

Where to get the saplings

Mode of Propagation

Seeds, Cuttings.

How to plant/cultivate

The land is prepared to good tilth by ploughing, harrowing and levelling.[3]

Commonly seen growing in areas

Tall grasslands, Meadows.

Photo Gallery

References

External Links