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Actaea racemosa L - Black cohosh

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Actaea racemosa inflorescence, Black cohosh

Black Cohosh has been used by Native Americans for more than two hundred years, after they discovered the root of the plant helped relieve menstrual cramps and symptoms of menopause.

Uses

Kidney issues, Malaria, Rheumatoid arthritis, Joint inflammation, Sore throat, Helping with labor, Menstrual cramps, Menopause.

Parts Used

Dried Roots, Leaves, Flower.

Chemical Composition

Black cohosh contains cimicifugin (macrotin) which has estrogenic effects. Also found in assay are acetein (antihypertensive effects) and ferulic/isoferulic acids (anti-inflammatory effects). The following components can also be found: isoflavones, salicyclic acid, tannins, resins, starch, and sugars[1]

Common names

Language Common name
Kannada
Hindi
Malayalam
Tamil
Telugu
Marathi NA
Gujarathi NA
Punjabi NA
Kashmiri NA
Sanskrit
English Black snake root, Bugbane


Properties

Reference: Dravya - Substance, Rasa - Taste, Guna - Qualities, Veerya - Potency, Vipaka - Post-digesion effect, Karma - Pharmacological activity, Prabhava - Therepeutics.

Dravya

Rasa

Guna

Veerya

Vipaka

Karma

Prabhava

Habit

Procumbent herb

Identification

Leaf

Kind Shape Feature
large Alternate, Pinnate The leaves are with deeply-cut segments

[2]

Flower

Type Size Color and composition Stamen More information
Unisexual 14-18cm long Yellow, Circular Each bears one large flower the disk being yellow and the rays white, tinged with purple beneath.

Fruit

Type Size Mass Appearance Seeds More information
Syncarp (sorosis), subglobose or ellipsoid with long echinate processes, orange when ripe seeds many, ovoid. {{{6}}}

Other features

List of Ayurvedic medicine in which the herb is used

Where to get the saplings

Mode of Propagation

Seeds, Cuttings.

How to plant/cultivate

Aracemosa grows in dependably moist, fairly heavy soil. It bears tall tapering racemes of white midsummer flowers on wiry black-purple stems, whose mildly unpleasant, medicinal smell at close range gives it the common name "Bugbane"[3]

Commonly seen growing in areas

Dry locations in sparse forests, Hedges, Forest clearings. .

Photo Gallery

References

External Links